Filter-it™

Version

Filter-it 1.0.2

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Introduction

Filter-it™ is a program for filtering out molecules with unwanted properties. It is build on top of OpenBabel open source C++ API for rapid calculation of molecular properties.

The program is packaged with a number of pre-programmed molecular properties that can be used for filtering. These properties include, amongst others:

  • Physicochemical parameters, such as logP, topological polar surface area criteria, number of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors, and Lipinski’s rule-of-five;
  • Graph-based properties, including ring-based parameters and rotatable bond criteria;
  • Selection criteria by means of smarts patterns;
  • Similarity criteria;
  • Three-dimensional distances between user-definable fragments.

Filter-it™ is a command line-driven program that is instructed by means of command line options and a user-definable filter file. It is by means of this filter file that the user can define the actual filter criteria to be used. Figure 1 describes the actual data flow:

Figure 1

Figure 1. The input and output flow of molecules and associated files in the program Filter-it™. Command line options are also indicated.

With a set of molecules as input, the program Filter-it™ categorizes these input molecules into 1) a set of molecules that fulfill all criteria as defined in the filter definition file (passed molecules), and 2) a set of molecules that do not fulfill at least one of the defined filter criteria (failed molecules).

The program Filter-it™ can also be run in tabulate mode where it functions as a property calculator. In this mode, the requested properties of all input molecules are simply calculated and tabulated. No filtering is done in this mode. This option might be useful for database characterization and for optimization of the filter parameters.

Usage

Command line interface

Filter-it™ is run from the command line as follows:

> filter-it [options]

Some options require an argument to be followed. For these cases, the argument is linked to the option with the = sign:

> filter-it --input=myfile.txt

Important

For options that may accept an argument, one should use the = character to link the option name to its argument. Leaving away this = character will lead to errors in the functioning of the tool.

The following sections describe in detail the different options.

Required command line options

--input=[file]
Specifies the name of the file containing the input molecules. The input file contains one or more molecules specified as a set of connection tables according specific molecular formats. The format of these connection tables is specified by the input filename extension or, with higher priority, by the optional --inputFormat option. The allowed input formats are those that are supported by OpenBabel. Compressed file formats are also allowed. The [file] specification is required.
--filter=[file]
This option specifies a the name of the filter file that describes the filter criteria to apply to the input molecules. A detailed overview of the specific format of this file and a list of all parameters is provided in the section on filter parameters. The [file] specification is required.

Tip

Use obabel -L formats read and obabel -L formats write to get a list of all read and write formats recognized by OpenBabel.

Optional command line options

--inputFormat=[format]
Specifies the format of the input file. The [format] specification is required when using this option. Allowed formats are the ones that are supported by OpenBabel.
--pass=[file]
Specifies the name of the file to which the molecules are written that have successfully passed all the filter criteria. The format of the file is specified by the file extension or, with higher priority, by the --passFormat option. If the file extension is .gz, a compressed file will be written. The [file] specification is required when using this option. In case a tabulate run mode has been requested (with the --tab option), then this argument is not required. Instead, in this situation the argument is simply ignored by the program.
--passFormat=[format]
Specifies the format of the pass file. The [format] specification is required when using this option. Allowed formats are the ones that are supported by OpenBabel.
--fail=[file]
Specifies the file to which molecules are written that fail for at least one of the filter criteria. The format of the file is specified by the file extension or, with higher priority, by the --failFormat option. If the extension is .gz, a compressed file will be written. The [file] specification is required when using this option. In case a tabulate run mode has been requested (with the --tab option), then this argument is not required. Instead, in this situation the argument is simply ignored by the program.
--failFormat=[format]
Specifies the format of the fail file. The [format] specification is required when using this option. Allowed formats are the ones that are supported by OpenBabel.
--tab or --tab=[file]
This flag directs the program to calculate all properties listed in the filter definition file without applying any filtering step. The calculated parameters are written to [file]. The [file] argument is optional; if not provided all output is written to standard output. In case the --tab option has been specified, the molecules are not written to the --pass and --fail files; instead, with the --tab option specified, these latter two options are not required and are not even processed by the program. Property tables as requested with --tab are calculated for the majority of properties, with the exception of a few. The properties that cannot be generated during a tabulate run are indicated further down.
--salts
Before any property calculation and filtering step takes place in Filter-it™, each molecule is cleaned by removing all small fragments that are present in the molecular connection table. Such small fragments are often salt fragments. Implementation-wise, salts are first removed, and then the actual filtering is taking place on the remaining part of the molecular entity. This prevents molecules to be filtered out due to unwanted salt fragments that should have been removed in first instance. The default salt-stripping step can be suppressed by specifying the --salts option, in which case no salt stripping occurs. In this case, all calculations and filtering steps are performed on the entire molecule together with all salt moieties that might be present in the molecular connection table.
--rename
Molecular titles are sometimes absent or misleading. In such cases, it might be useful to rename the title of each molecule into a number reflecting the sequence of the molecule in the input file. This feature is optional and is initiated with the --rename option. If this option is not provided, renaming will not occur.
--noLog
When the program is run in the normal filtering mode (not in the tabulate mode), output messages are written to standard output to indicate whether or not the molecule fails or passes the filter criteria. For large input files, this could lead to large logging files. Therefore, this command line option is provided to turn off this default behaviour.
--help or -h
Displays a short help on standard error.
--version or -v
Displays the program version on standard error.

Standard output and standard error: where does it all go to?

Filter-it™ is a command line-driven program that produces different kinds output that is directed to standard output, standard error and/or specific files.

All of the following output is written to standard error:

  • Help information generated by the -h or --help command line arguments;
  • Program version information generated by the -v or --version command line arguments;
  • Error messages generated by the program in the course of the filtering procedure;
  • Warning messages generated by the program in the course of the filtering procedure;
  • The version banner generated at the start of the filtering procedure;
  • The statistics banner generated at the end of the filtering procedure.

On the contrary, all of the following is written to standard output:

  • When the program is run in --tab mode: all calculated properties, unless when requested to write to a file (--tab=[file]);
  • When not run in --tab mode: all ‘passed’ or ‘failed’ logging information for each compound. This behaviour can be switched off with the --noLog argument.

Tip

In most Unix shells, you can capture standard error using the following command:

> filter-it [options] 2> error.log

You can also capture standard output using the following command:

> filter-it [options] 1> error.log

and the next example captures both standard output and error into the same file:

> filter-it [options] &> error.log

Filter parameters

The filter file (specified at the command line with --filter) specifies the filter criteria for all of the calculated physical properties, and specifies also the functional group substructures that should be included or excluded during the filtering step. Filter criteria are specified using rules.

Rules are specified by a keyword that is optionally followed by some limits or specifications. Words can be separated by white space. Blanc lines, or lines starting with # of //, are ignored. These latter can be used as comment lines.

Rule statements may be repeated in a single filter definition file. Unless indicated otherwise, in that case only the first encountered rule is included for the filtering. The eight general types of rules that may occur in a filter file are:

  • include rules
  • title rules
  • element rules
  • topological property rules
  • physical property rules
  • fragment rules
  • sdf-data rules
  • distance rules

Each of these are detailed in the following sections.

Include rules

INCLUDE

Include rules are specified with the INCLUDE keyword, and specify the name of a file which should be included starting at the position of the specific include rule. The purpose of these include rules is to enable nesting of different filter files into one large filter specification. For example, one could prepare a file in which definitions of unwanted functional groups are specified, and another file in which definitions on drug-like physicochemical parameters are specified. With the INCLUDE keyword, one can merge these two files in one large set of rules.

Include rules are specified by the INCLUDE keyword followed by the name of the file that should be included:

INCLUDE /Users/hans/Filters/Druglike.sieve
INCLUDE /Users/hans/Filters/Clean.sieve

Tilde expansion is not working; only complete filenames are allowed. For example, the following will generate an error message and will cause the program to halt:

INCLUDE ~/Filters/Clean.sieve

An unlimited number of INCLUDE keywords are allowed and the keywords may be nested as well. If more than one INCLUDE keyword is provided, all the keywords are processed in the same order as that these have been defined in the corresponding filter file(s).

Title rules

TITLE

Title rules filter the input molecules based on their molecular titles. Molecules have at most a single title. In sdf-files, this molecular title is typically specified as the first line of each molecular entry, while in SMILES entries this title could optionally be specified following the SMILES specification separated by whitespace:

> cat benzene.smi
c1ccccc1 benzene

Title rules are specified with the TITLE keyword. Multiple title rules, each specifying different title strings, may be specified. In this case, each of the different title rules will be checked for a valid match against each of the input molecules. If a match has been found between the molecule and one of the different title rules, the molecule is flagged to pass for this criterion. If no match could be found between the molecule and all of the different title rules, the molecule is flagged to fail.

The title itself should be enclosed by double quotes to allow for titles that contain spaces:

TITLE “Molecule title”

If quotes are to be treated as being part of the title, a backslash sign should precede the quotes:

TITLE “Molecule title \” with backslash”

In case the tabulate mode has been selected for running Filter-it™ (command line option --tab), specification of the TITLE keyword without the actual title string is sufficient. When run in this mode, the program will extract the molecular titles and write these out to the file specified by the --tab option.

Element rules

Element rules are used to specify restrictions on the atomic elements within the molecules. In the current version of Filter-it™, two specific element rules have been implemented:

  • ONLY_ELEMENTS
  • EXCLUDED_ELEMENTS

Element rules are specified by the appropriate keyword followed by a list of element symbols. The specification of the elements should be separated by white space, and can be written in lowercase, uppercase, or a combination of both. Quotes are not allowed:

ONLY_ELEMENTS H C N O Br I S
EXCLUDED_ELEMENTS C N O S

For both types of element rules, only one of each is allowed in the filter file. If more than one identical element rule keyword is provided, only the first keyword will be processed and a message will be printed to warn the user that more than one identical keyword has been encountered. All the information provided by the subsequent identical rules in the filter file is neglected, as exemplified here:

> cat filter.txt
ONLY_ELEMENTS C H O N
ONLY_ELEMENTS Br Cl C

> filter-it --input=BIO-20111009-PPI.smi --filter=filter.txt --fail=fail.smi --noLog
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Filter-it v1.0.0 | Feb 16 2012 11:59:36

  -> GCC:        4.2.1 (Based on Apple Inc. build 5658) (LLVM build 2335.15.00)
  -> Open Babel: 2.3.1

Copyright 2012-2014 by Silicos-it

Filter-it is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License as published
by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
(at your option) any later version.

Filter-it is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
GNU Lesser General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU Lesser General Public License
along with Filter-it.  If not, see http://www.gnu.org/licenses/.

Filter-it is linked against OpenBabel version 2.
OpenBabel is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
the Free Software Foundation version 2 of the License.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

## INITIATING FILTER PARAMETERS ##

> PARSING FILTER FILE "filter.txt"
  -> ONLY_ELEMENTS  C H O N
  -> WARNING: line 2 of file "filter.txt": duplicate ONLY_ELEMENTS keyword encountered: skipping this one.

COMMAND_LINE OPTIONS:

  -> Strip salts:       yes
  -> Rename titles:     no
  -> Tabulate mode:     no
  -> Logging:           no
  -> Filter file:       filter.txt
  -> Input file:        BIO-20111009-PPI.smi
  -> Input file format: smiles
  -> Fail file:         fail.smi
  -> Fail file format:  smiles


## STARTING CALCULATIONS ##

CALCULATED

Molecule counts:
 -> Passed: 62
 -> Failed: 13
 -> Total:  75

## FINISHED CALCULATIONS ##

In this example, the molecules are filtered on the presence of the H, C, N, O elements, as defined by the first ONLY_ELEMENTS rule. The rule defined by the second ONLY_ELEMENTS is neglected.

In the next example, both element rules are used in the filtering since the two specific keywords are different:

ONLY_ELEMENTS H C N O Br I S
EXCLUDED_ELEMENTS Cl

In case the tabulate mode has been selected for running Filter-it™ (command line option --tab), then only the specification of the keyword without the elements is sufficient. When run in this mode, the program writes the calculated molecular formula to standard output.

ONLY_ELEMENTS

This specific element rule specifies the list of elements that are allowed in the input molecules. Molecules consisting of additional elements that have not been specified by this rule are flagged to fail. Implicit and explicit hydrogen atoms are taken into account for the filtering.

In the following example, only molecules that contain elements out of the H, C, N, O, Br, I, or S list are flagged for passing:

ONLY_ELEMENTS H C N O Br I S

Molecules with for example a fluor atom would be rejected according this example.

EXCLUDED_ELEMENTS

This rule specifies the elements that are not allowed in the input molecules. Molecules with elements that are specified by this rule are flagged for failure. Implicit and explicit hydrogen atoms are taken into account during the filtering step.

In the following example, molecules that contain one or more halogens are rejected:

EXCLUDED_ELEMENTS F Cl Br I

Topological property rules

Topological property rules specify limits on topology-derived properties. These rules are specified by the appropriate keyword followed by a minimum and a maximum numerical limit for the calculated property:

KEYWORD minimum maximum

The keyword specifies the topological property and the minimum and maximum numerical values specify the limit criteria that are used for the filtering. The minimum and maximum limits are inclusive, meaning that all molecules with a property value larger or equal than minimum and smaller or equal than maximum are flagged to pass for that particular property.

In cases where a minimum or maximum limit is hard to specify, for example when one does not want to specify a certain limit, a wildcard (*) character may be substituted. In the next example, all molecules with a minimum of 30 non-hydrogen atoms are passed through:

ATOMS 30 *

In the next example, all molecules with more than 20 heavy atoms are filtered out:

ATOMS * 20

which is similar as specifying:

ATOMS 0 20

In the current version of Filter-it™, the following topological property rules have been implemented:

  • ATOMS
  • CARBONS
  • HETERO_ATOMS
  • HETERO_CARBON_RATIO
  • HALIDES
  • HALIDE_FRACTION
  • BONDS
  • ROTATABLE_BONDS
  • RIGID_BONDS
  • FLEXIBILITY
  • CHIRAL_CENTERS
  • HBOND_ACCEPTORS
  • HBOND_DONORS
  • LIPINSKI_ACCEPTORS
  • LIPINSKI_DONORS
  • FORMAL_CHARGES
  • TOTAL_FORMAL_CHARGE
  • RINGS
  • ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_RING
  • ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_RING
  • RING_FRACTION
  • AROMATIC_RINGS
  • ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_AROMATIC_RING
  • ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_AROMATIC_RING
  • AROMATIC_RING_FRACTION
  • AROMATIC_OVER_TOTAL_RING_FRACTION
  • NONAROMATIC_RINGS
  • ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_NONAROMATIC_RING
  • ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_NONAROMATIC_RING
  • NONAROMATIC_RING_FRACTION
  • RINGSYSTEMS
  • ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_RINGSYSTEM
  • ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_RINGSYSTEM
  • RINGSYSTEM_FRACTION
  • RINGS_IN_SMALLEST_RINGSYSTEM
  • RINGS_IN_LARGEST_RINGSYSTEM
  • SIDECHAINS
  • ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_SIDECHAIN
  • ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_SIDECHAIN
  • SIDECHAIN_FRACTION
  • CORES
  • ATOMS_IN_CORE
  • CORE_FRACTION
  • BRIDGES
  • ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_BRIDGE
  • ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_BRIDGE
  • BRIDGE_FRACTION

For each of these topological property rules, only one of each is allowed in the filter file. If more than one identical rule keyword are provided, only the keyword first encountered will be processed correctly and a message will be printed to warn the user that more than one identical keyword has been found. All the information provided by the subsequent identical rules in the filter file is neglected.

When the program is run in tabulate mode (with the --tab command line option), then the minimum and maximum limits are not required and do not have to be specified (although they are allowed in the filter file).

In the following sections, all topological property rules are detailed.

Atom-based rules

ATOMS

Specifies the number of non-hydrogen atoms (the so-called heavy atoms) as filter criterion. In the following example, all molecules with ≥10 and ≤20 heavy atoms will pass for this criterion, while all other molecules are rejected:

ATOMS 10 20

CARBONS

Specifies the number of carbon atoms as filter criterion. In the following example, only molecules with ≥10 and ≤20 carbon atoms will pass for this criterion, while all other molecules are rejected:

CARBONS 10 20

HETERO_ATOMS

Specifies the number of heteroatoms as filter criterion. Heteroatoms are defined as the atoms that are not hydrogen or carbon. In the following example, all molecules with ≥10 and ≤20 heteroatoms will pass, while all other molecules are rejected:

HETERO_ATOMS 10 20

HETERO_CARBON_RATIO

Specifies the ratio of the number of heteroatoms over the number of carbon atoms. Heteroatoms are defined as all atoms that are not hydrogen or carbon. For example, the HETERO_CARBON_RATIO for chloroform (CHCl3) is 3 / 1 = 3. If there are no carbon atoms, then a value of zero is returned and the molecule is marked to fail for this criterion, regardless of the limit criteria. In the following example, all molecules with a hetero-over-carbon ratio of ≥0.5 and ≤1.5 will pass, while all other molecules will fail:

HETERO_CARBON_RATIO 0.5 1.5

HALIDES

Specifies the number of halide elements as filter criterion. A halide is defined as a F, Cl, Br, or I element. In the following example, all molecules with more than three halides are flagged to fail:

HALIDES 0 3

HALIDE_FRACTION

Specifies the ratio of the halide weight over the total molecular weight as filter criterion. A halide is defined as a F, Cl, Br, or I atom. Implicit hydrogen atoms are taken into account for the calculation of the total molecular weight. If the total molecular weight is zero, then a value of zero is returned and the molecule is flagged to fail for this criterion, regardless of the limit criteria. In the following example, all molecules with a halide-over-total weight ratio between 0.5 and 0.9 are flagged to pass this criterion:

HALIDE_FRACTION 0.5 0.9

HBOND_ACCEPTORS

Specifies the number of hydrogen bond acceptors as filter criterion. A hydrogen bond acceptor is defined as an atom with one of the following properties:

  • an aromatic nitrogen with no hydrogen atoms connected, no amide nitrogen, and not carrying a positive charge; or
  • an aliphatic nitrogen with no hydrogen atoms connected and not carrying a positive charge; or
  • any oxygen atom that is not carrying a positive charge; or
  • a thionyl (=S) sulfur atom;

but excluding:

  • amide nitrogen atoms.

In the following example, all molecules with less than 11 hydrogen bond acceptors are allowed, while all other molecules are rejected:

HBOND_ACCEPTORS 0 10

HBOND_DONORS

Specifies the number of hydrogen bond donors as filter criterion. A hydrogen bond donor is defined as an hydrogen atom with one of the following properties:

  • each hydrogen bonded to a nitrogen; or
  • each hydrogen bonded to an oxygen; or
  • each hydrogen bonded to a sulfur.

According these definitions, a nitrogen with one connected hydrogen is counted as one hydrogen bond donor, while a nitrogen with two hydrogen atoms connected is counted as two hydrogen bond donors. In the following example, all molecules with less than six hydrogen bond donors are flagged to pass this criterion, while all other molecules are flagged to fail:

HBOND_DONORS 0 5

LIPINSKI_ACCEPTORS

Specifies the number of Lipinski’s hydrogen bond acceptors as filter criterion [5]. A Lipinski hydrogen bond acceptor is defined as any nitrogen or oxygen atom regardless of the number of connected hydrogen atoms. In the following example, all molecules with less than 11 Lipinski hydrogen bond acceptors are accepted, while all other molecules are rejected:

LIPINSKI_ACCEPTORS 0 10

LIPINSKI_DONORS

Specifies the number of Lipinski’s hydrogen bond donors as filter criterion [5]. A Lipinski hydrogen bond donor is defined as an hydrogen atom with one of the following properties:

  • each hydrogen connected to a nitrogen; or
  • each hydrogen connected to an oxygen.

According these definitions, a nitrogen with one connected hydrogen is counted as one hydrogen bond donor, while a nitrogen with two hydrogen atoms connected is counted as two hydrogen bond donors. In the following example, all molecules with less than six Lipinski hydrogen bond donors are accepted, while all other molecules are rejected:

LIPINSKI_DONORS 0 5

FORMAL_CHARGES

This keyword specifies the total number of atoms bearing a formal charge as filter criterion. Correct assignment of formal charges is the responsibility of the user as Filter-it™ is not modifying the input molecules. In the following example, only molecules with all neutral atoms neutral are passed successfully:

FORMAL_CHARGES 0 0

TOTAL_FORMAL_CHARGE

This keyword specifies the total molecular formal charge as filter criterion. Correct assignment of formal charges is the responsibility of the user as Filter-it™ is not modifying the input molecules. In the following example, only molecules with a neutral formal charge are passed successfully:

TOTAL_FORMAL_CHARGE 0 0

Bond-based rules

BONDS

Specifies the number of bonds between non-hydrogen atoms (the so-called heavy atoms) as filter criterion. In the following example, all molecules with ≥10 and ≤20 bonds are accepted, while all other molecules are rejected:

BONDS 10 20

ROTATABLE_BONDS

Specifies the number of rotatable bonds as filter criterion. A rotatable bond is defined as follows:

  • bond is not double; and
  • bond is not triple; and
  • bond is not a primary amide (O=C-NH2); and
  • bond is not a secondary amide (or O=C-NH1-).

and excluding:

  • bonds in ring; and
  • end-standing bonds; and
  • bonds to hydrogen atoms.

In the following example, molecules with more than 10 rotatable bonds would be excluded:

ROTATABLE_BONDS 0 10

RIGID_BONDS

Specifies the number of rigid bonds as filter criterion. A rigid bond is defined as follows:

  • bond is double; or
  • bond is triple; or
  • bond is a secondary amide (O=C-NH1-);

but excluding:

  • end-standing bonds; and
  • bonds to hydrogen atoms; and
  • bonds in ring.

In the following example, molecules with more than 10 rigid bonds would be excluded by this filter criterion:

RIGID_BONDS 0 10

FLEXIBILITY

Flexibility is defined as the ratio of the number of rotatable bonds (as defined by the ROTATABLE_BONDS property) over the total number of bonds (as defined by the sum of the ROTATABLE_BONDS and RIGID_BONDS properties). The flexibility is always between 0 and 1, with 0 the extreme case when the molecule contains no rotatable bonds, and 1 being the theoretical case when all bonds are rotatable. When the molecule contains no bonds, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is filtered according the specified criteria. When the molecule contains no non-hydrogen atoms, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is flagged to fail for this criterion. In the following example, molecules with a flexibility between 0.3 and 0.5 are passed along:

FLEXIBILITY 0.3 0.5

Chirality-based rules

CHIRAL_CENTERS

Specifies the number of chiral centers as filter criterion. In the following example, all molecules with less than three chiral centers are flagged for acceptance, while all other molecules are rejected:

CHIRAL_CENTERS 0 2

Ring-based rules

Figure 2 illustrates the concept of rings and ringsystems. Rings are detected by a smallest-subset-of-smallest-rings (SSSR) algorithm, as implemented by OpenBabel and based on the Blue Obelisk findSmallestSetOfSmallestRings algorithm.

Figure 2

Figure 2. The concept of rings and ringsystems illustrated by example. In this example, the molecule consists of three ringsystems (A-C) and six rings. The number of atoms in each of these three ringsystems varies between 6 (ringsystem A) and 13 (ringsystem B), while the number of atoms in the rings varies between five and six.

RINGS

Specifies the total number of rings as filter criterion. If the input molecule has no rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified minimum and maximum criteria determine whether the molecule will be passed or not. In the following example, molecules with five to six rings would be passed:

RINGS 5 6

ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_RING

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the smallest ring. With reference to the example in Figure 2, the smallest ring is the five-membered ring in ringsystem ‘C’, containing five atoms. When the molecule has no rings, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is flagged to pass for thsi criterion. In the following example, only molecules with no rings, or with the smallest ring consisting of 5 to 6 atoms, are passed succesfully:

ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_RING 5 6

ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_RING

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the largest ring. With reference to the example in Figure 2, the largest ring is the six-membered ring in ringsystems ‘A’, ‘B’ or ‘C’, each containing 6 atoms. When the molecule has no rings, filtering is not performed (the molecule is flagged as ‘passed’) and a value of zero is returned. In the following example, only molecules with no rings, or with the largest ring consisting of 5 to 6 atoms, are flagged to pass this criterion:

ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_RING 5 6

RING_FRACTION

The ring fraction is calculated as the number of ring atoms divided by the total number of atoms. The outcome is always a number between 0 and 1, both numbers inclusive. Hydrogen atoms are not taken into account for the calculation. If the input molecule has no rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified minimum and maximum parameters will determine whether the molecule should pass or not. When the molecule contains no non-hydrogen atoms, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is marked to fail for this criterion. In the following example, molecules with no rings, or with a maximum of 30% of all non-hydrogen atoms being part of rings, are passed through:

RING_FRACTION 0 0.3

AROMATIC_RINGS

Specifies the total number of aromatic rings as filter criterion. If the input molecule has no rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified minimum and maximum parameters determine whether the molecule will be passed or not. In the following example, molecules with one to two aromatic rings would be passed:

AROMATIC_RINGS 1 2

ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_AROMATIC_RING

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the smallest aromatic ring. When the molecule has no rings, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is flagged to pass for this criterion. In the following example, only molecules with no rings, or with the smallest aromatic ring consisting of 5 to 6 atoms, are passed:

ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_AROMATIC_RING 5 6

ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_AROMATIC_RING

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the largest aromatic ring. When the molecule has no rings, a value of zero is returned and the molecule passes this criterion. In the following example, only molecules with no rings, or with the largest aromatic ring consisting of 5 to 6 atoms, are passed:

ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_AROMATIC_RING 5 6

AROMATIC_RING_FRACTION

The aromatic ring fraction is calculated as the number of aromatic ring atoms divided by the total number of atoms. The outcome is always a number between 0 and 1, both limits inclusive. Hydrogen atoms are not taken into account for the calculation. If the input molecule has no rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified minimum and maximum parameters determine whether the molecule will pass. When the molecule contains no non-hydrogen atoms, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is marked to fail for this criterion. In the following example, molecules with no rings, or with a maximum of 30% of all non-hydrogen atoms being part of aromatic rings, are passed through:

AROMATIC_RING_FRACTION 0 0.3

AROMATIC_OVER_TOTAL_RING_FRACTION

The AROMATIC_OVER_TOTAL_RING_FRACTION is calculated as the number of aromatic ring atoms divided by the total number of rings. The outcome is always a number between 0 and 1, both numbers inclusive. If the input molecule has no aromatic rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified minimum and maximum parameters determine whether the molecule will be passed or not. When the molecule contains no non-hydrogen atoms or contains no rings, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is marked to fail for this criterion. In the following example, molecules with no aromatic rings, or with a maximum of 30% of all rings being aromatic, are passed:

AROMATIC_OVER_TOTAL_RING_FRACTION 0 0.3

NONAROMATIC_RINGS

Specifies the total number of non-aromatic rings as filter criterion. If the input molecule has no rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified minimum and maximum parameters determine whether the molecule will be passed or not. In the following example, molecules with one to two non-aromatic rings would be passed:

NONAROMATIC_RINGS 1 2

ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_NONAROMATIC_RING

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the smallest non-aromatic ring. When the molecule has no rings, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is passed for this criterion. In the following example, only molecules with no rings, or with the smallest non-aromatic ring consisting of 5 to 6 atoms, are passed:

ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_NONAROMATIC_RING 5 6

ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_NONAROMATIC_RING

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the largest non-aromatic ring. When the molecule has no rings, filtering is not performed and a value of zero is returned. In the following example, only molecules with no rings, or with the largest non-aromatic ring consisting of 5 to 6 atoms, are passed:

ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_NONAROMATIC_RING 5 6

NONAROMATIC_RING_FRACTION

The non-aromatic ring fraction is calculated as the number of non-aromatic ring atoms divided by the total number of atoms. The outcome is always a number between 0 and 1, both numbers inclusive. Hydrogen atoms are not taken into account for the calculation. If the input molecule has no rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified minimum and maximum parameters determine whether the molecule will pass. When the molecule contains no non-hydrogen atoms, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is marked to fail for this criterion. In the following example, molecules with no rings, or with a maximum of 30% of all non-hydrogen atoms being part of non-aromatic rings, are passed through:

NONAROMATIC_RING_FRACTION 0 0.3

NONAROMATIC_OVER_TOTAL_RING_FRACTION

The NONAROMATIC_OVER_TOTAL_RING_FRACTION is calculated as the number of non-aromatic ring atoms divided by the total number of rings. The outcome is always a number between 0 and 1, both numbers inclusive. If the input molecule has no non-aromatic rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified minimum and maximum parameters determine whether the molecule will pass. When the molecule contains no non-hydrogen atoms or contains no rings, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is marked to fail for this criterion. In the following example, molecules with no rings, or with a maximum of 30% of all rings being non-aromatic, are passed through:

NONAROMATIC_OVER_TOTAL_RING_FRACTION 0 0.3

RINGSYSTEMS

Specifies a limit on the number of ringsystems in a molecule. The entire ringsystem of a molecule is defined as the entire set of rings that remain after deleting all the atoms and bonds that do not belong to at least one ring. In the following example, only molecules with four ringsystems will be flagged to pass:

RINGSYSTEMS 4 4

If the input molecule has no rings then a value of zero is returned and filtered according the specified minimum and maximum parameters.

ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_RINGSYSTEM

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the smallest ringsystem. The quantification of ‘smallest ringsystem’ is based on the number of atoms in the ringsystem. With reference to the example in Figure 2, the smallest ringsystem is ringsystem ‘A’, which contains 6 atoms. When the molecule has no rings, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is passing for this criterion. In the following example, only molecules with no rings, or with the smallest ring consisting of 5 to 6 atoms, are passed:

ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_RINGSYSTEM 5 6

ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_RINGSYSTEM

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the largest ringsystem. The quantification of ‘largest ringsystem’ is based on the number of atoms in the ringsystem. With reference to the example in Figure 2, the largest ringsystem is ‘B’, containing 13 atoms. When the molecule has no rings, a value of zero is returned and is flagged to pass. In the following example, only molecules with no rings, or with a largest ringsystem consisting of up to 7 atoms, are passed:

ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_RINGSYSTEM * 7

RINGSYSTEM_FRACTION

The ringsystem fraction is calculated as the number of ringsystem atoms divided by the total number of atoms. The outcome is always a number between 0 and 1, both numbers inclusive. Hydrogen atoms are not taken into account for the calculation. This filter produces exactly the same result as the RING_FRACTION filter. If the input molecule has no rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified minimum and maximum parameters determine whether the molecule will be passed or not. When the molecule contains no non-hydrogen atoms, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is marked to fail for this criterion. In the following example, molecules with no rings, or with a maximum of 30% of all non-hydrogen atoms being part of a ringsystem, are passed through:

RINGSYSTEM_FRACTION 0 0.3

RINGS_IN_SMALLEST_RINGSYSTEM

Specifies a limit on the number of rings in the smallest ringsystem. The quantification of ‘smallest ringsystem’ is based on the number of rings in the ringsystem. This is different to the ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_RINGSYSTEM filter, in whcih the number of atoms is used as quantification. With reference to the example in Figure 2, the smallest ringsystem is ringsystem ‘A’, containing a single ring. When the molecule has no rings, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is flagged to pass for this criterion. In the following example, only molecules with no rings, or with the smallest ringsystem consisting of one ring, would be passed:

RINGS_IN_SMALLEST_RINGSYSTEM 1 1

RINGS_IN_LARGEST_RINGSYSTEM

Specifies a limit on the number of rings in the largest ringsystem. The quantification of ‘largest ringsystem’ is based on the number of rings in the ringsystem. This is different to the ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_RINGSYSTEM filter, where the number of atoms is used as quantification. With reference to the example in Figure 2, the largest ringsystem is ringsystem ‘C’, which contains three rings. When the molecule has no rings, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is flagged to pass for this criterion. In the following example, only molecules with no rings, or with the largest ringsystem consisting of one ring, would be passed:

RINGS_IN_LARGEST_RINGSYSTEM 1 1

Molecular skeleton-based rules

Figure 3

Figure 3 The concept of ‘sidechains’, ‘bridges’, and ‘cores’ illustrated on a virtual molecule. In this example, the molecule contains two ‘sidechains’ (colored in blue), one ‘bridge’ (shown in red). Finally, the ‘core’ of the molecule is composed of the black lines (the ringsystems) in combination with the ‘bridges’ (red lines).

SIDECHAINS

Specifies the total number of sidechains as filter criterion. Sidechains are calculated in an iterative fashion by virtually removing all atoms having a connectivity of one, until no more such atoms remain. The set of all removed atoms compose the sidechain atoms. Hydrogen atoms are not taken into account for the calculation. Figure 3 above illustrates the concept of sidechains on an example molecule. The molecule shown in Figure 3 contains two sidechains. Hydrogen atoms are excluded. If the input molecule has no rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified minimum and maximum parameters determine whether the molecule will be passed or not. In the following example, only molecules with five sidechains would be passed:

SIDECHAINS 5 5

ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_SIDECHAIN

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the smallest sidechain of the molecule. In the example above in Figure 3, the smallest sidechain contains one atom. Hydrogen atoms are excluded from the calculation. When the molecule has no rings, filtering is not performed and a value of zero is returned. In the following example, only molecules with either no sidechains, or molecules where the smallest sidechain may consist between one and three atoms, would be passed:

ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_SIDECHAIN 1 3

ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_SIDECHAIN

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the largest sidechain of the molecule. Hydrogen atoms are excluded from the calculation. This criterion returns zero if the molecule contains no sidechains, and in this case the filtering is not applied. In the example above in Figure 3, the largest sidechain contains three atoms. In case the molecule has no rings, filtering is not performed and a value of zero is returned. In the following example, only molecules with either no sidechains, or molecules where the largest sidechain may consist between one and three atoms, would be passed:

ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_SIDECHAIN 1 3

SIDECHAIN_FRACTION

Specifies the fraction of sidechain atoms over the total atom count as filter criterion. Hydrogen atoms are excluded from the calculation. If the input molecule has no rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified minimum and maximum parameters determine whether the molecule will be passed or not. When the molecule contains no non-hydrogen atoms, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is marked to fail for this criterion. In the following example, molecules of which at least half of its atoms are sidechain atoms are passed through:

SIDECHAIN_FRACTION 0.5 *

CORES

Specifies the total number of core fragments as filter criterion. Cores are the remaining atoms when all sidechains have been removed (see Figure 3). According the definition of a core, molecules can contain either a single core or no core at all. If the input molecule has no rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified filter criteria determine whether the molecule will be passed or not. In the following example, only molecules having a single core would be passed:

CORES 1 1

ATOMS_IN_CORE

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the core of the molecule. Hydrogen atoms are excluded from the calculation. When the molecule does not contain a core, then a value of zero is returned and filtering is not performed. In the following example, only molecules with either no core, or molecules with a core consisting of exactly 22 atoms would be passed:

ATOMS_IN_CORE 22 22

CORE_FRACTION

Specifies the fraction of core atoms over the total atom count as filter criterion. Hydrogen atoms are excluded from the calculation. This criterion returns zero if the molecule contains no cores, and the filtering is applied according the limits specified as criteria. When the molecule contains no non-hydrogen atoms, a value of zero is returned and the molecule is marked to fail for this criterion. In the following example, molecules of which at least half of its atoms are core atoms are passed through:

CORE_FRACTION 0.5 *

BRIDGES

Specifies the total number of bridge fragments as filter criterion. Hydrogen atoms are excluded from the calculations. Bridges are calculated as the remaining atoms when all sidechains and ring systems have been removed (Figure 3). If the input molecule has no rings then a value of zero is returned and the specified filter criteria determine whether the molecule will be passed or not. In the following example, only molecules having two or three bridges would be passed:

BRIDGES 2 3

ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_BRIDGE

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the smallest bridge of the molecule. Hydrogen atoms are not counted. When the molecule does not contain a bridge a value of zero is returned and filtering is not performed. In the following example, only molecules with either no bridge, or molecules in which the smallest bridge contains between one and three atoms would be passed:

ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_BRIDGE 1 3

ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_BRIDGE

Specifies a limit on the number of atoms in the largest bridge of the molecule. Hydrogen atoms are not counted. When the molecule does not contain a bridge a value of zero is returned and filtering is not performed. In the following example, only molecules with either no bridge, or molecules in which the largest bridge contains between one and three atoms would be passed:

ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_BRIDGE 1 3

BRIDGE_FRACTION

Specifies the fraction of bridge atoms over the total atom count as filter criterion. Hydrogen atoms are excluded from the calculation. A value of zero is returned when the molecule contains no bridges, and the filtering is applied according the limits specified as parameters. When the molecule contains no non-hydrogen atoms, a value of zero is returned and the molecule will be marked to fail for this criterion. In the following example, molecules of which at least half of its atoms are bridge atoms are passed through:

BRIDGE_FRACTION 0.5 *

Physical property rules

Physical property rules specify limits on a number of physical properties. Physical property rules are specified in a manner identical to the topological property rules, i.e. using the appropriate keyword followed by a minimum and a maximum limit for the particular property:

KEYWORD minimum maximum

In the current version of Filter-it™, the following physical property rules have been implemented:

  • MOLWT
  • LOGP
  • LOGS
  • TPSA
  • ANDREWS_ENERGY
  • LIGAND_EFFICIENCY

For each of these physical property rules, only one of each is allowed in the filter file. If more than one identical rule keyword is provided, only the first encountered keyword will be processed correctly and a message will be printed to warn the user that more than one identical keyword has been encountered. All the information provided by the subsequent identical rules in the filter file is neglected.

When the program is run in tabulate mode (with the --tab command line option), the minimum and maximum limits are not required.

The following sections detail each of the physical property rules.

MOLWT

Specifies the molecular weight as filter criterion. In the following example, all molecules with a molecular weight ≥300 and ≤500 Dalton are accepted, while all other molecules are rejected:

MOLWT 300 500

LOGP

Specifies a limit on the calculated logP, which is the negative logarithm of the octanol/water distribution of the compound. Compounds with a preference for fatty environments will have a large logP, while the logP of more polar compounds will be lower or negative. The algorithm for calculating the logP is based on Silicos-it’s implementation as described in detail below. In the following example, only molecules with a calculated logP ≤5 are passed through:

LOGP * 5

LOGS

Specifies a limit on the calculated logS, which is the negative logarithm of the water solubility of the compound. Soluble compounds will have a large logS, while rather insoluble compounds will have a small or negative logS. The algorithm for calculating the logP is based on a proprietary implementation of Silicos-it and is explained in detail below. In the following example, only molecules with a calculated logS ≤-5 are passed through:

LOGS * -5

TPSA

Specifies a limit on the topological polar surface area. The algorithm for calculating the topological polar surface area is based on the Ertl implementation [1], and is expressed in squared Å. In the following example, only molecules with a calculated topological polar surface area ≤150 Å are passed through:

TPSA 0 150

ANDREWS_ENERGY

This parameter specifies limits on the predicted molecular binding energy calculated according a modified version of the method of Andrews and coworkers [2]. When using this filter parameter, it is important that the correct ionization state of the molecules is used. As the Andrews’ energy depends heavily on the correct protonation state of primary amines, carboxylic acids and phosphate groups, care should be taken that these moieties are input in their correct ionization form. As Filter-it™ does not take care of that, it becomes the user’s responsability. In the following example, only molecules with an Andrews’ energy between 10 and 15 kcal/mol are passed through:

ANDREWS_ENERGY 10 15

LIGAND_EFFICIENCY

The ligand efficiency of a molecule is normally defined as being the total binding energy (expressed in kcal/mol units) for a given protein target divided by the number of non-hydrogen atom of the ligand. The ligand efficiency provided in this context is the maximal value that might be expected for a given compound in case of optimal interaction with the protein. For implementation details, see below. In the following example, only molecules with a predicted ligand efficiency higher than 0.37 (the mean of the training set) are passed through:

LIGAND_EFFICIENCY 0.37 *

ADMET rules

ADMET property rules specify limits on a number of in silico ADME/tox properties. ADMET property rules are specified in a manner identical to the topological property rules, i.e. using the appropriate keyword followed by a minimum and a maximum limit for the particular property:

KEYWORD minimum maximum

In the current version of Filter-it™, the following ADME/tox-related property rules have been implemented:

  • ADMET_SCORE
  • LIPINSKI_VIOLATIONS
  • ABSORPTION

For each of these three property rules, only one of each is allowed in the filter file. If more than one identical keyword is provided, only the first keyword will be processed correctly and a message will be printed to warn the user that more than one identical keyword has been encountered. All the information provided by the subsequent identical rules in the filter file is neglected. When the program is run in tabulate mode (with the --tab command line option), the minimum and maximum limits are not required.

In the following sections, each of the specific ADME/tox property rules have been detailed.

ADMET_SCORE

Specifies the ADMET score as filter criterion. The ADMET score has been orginally described by Gleeson and coworkers [3] and is calculated according the following equation:

$$ \text{ADMET_SCORE} = \frac{\vert 2.5 - logp \vert}{2.0} + \frac{\vert 330 - mw \vert}{120} $$

with mw being the molecular weight of the molecule (calculated with the MOLWT paramete) and logp the calculated logP (calculated with the LOGP parameter). If the molecular weight is less than 330 da, a value of zero is used as molecular mass.

In the following example, all molecules with a maximum ADMET_SCORE of 1 are accepted, while all other molecules are rejected:

ADMET_SCORE * 1

LIPINSKI_VIOLATIONS

This parameter specifies a limit on the number of violations against Lipinski’s rule-of-five [5]. This rule-of-five is defined as:

  • Number of Lipinski’s hydrogen bond acceptors should be ≤10 (calculated with the LIPINSKI_ACCEPTORS keyword);
  • Number of Lipinski’s hydrogen bond donors should be ≤5 (calculated with the LIPINSKI_DONORS keyword);
  • Calculated logP should be ≤5 (calculated with the LOGP keyword);
  • Molecular weight should be ≤500 (calculated with the MOLWT keyword).

In the following example, only molecules with at most one violation against Lipinski’s rule-of-five are passed through:

LIPINSKI_VIOLATIONS 0 1

ABSORPTION

This parameter specifies a limit on the predicted passive intestinal absorption (PAI) of drugs. The PAI is calculated according a paper of Egan and coworkers [4], and is based on a multivariate analysis of the molecular topological polar surface area and the calculated logP. The calculated absorption property returns only two possible values:

  • 1 (‘true’) if the predicted PAI for the compound is higher than 90%. In the original publication [4], these compounds are labeled as ‘WAbs’ (‘well-absorbed’);
  • 0 (‘false’) if the predicted PAI for the compound is lower than 30%. This corresponds to the ‘PAbs’ (‘poorly-absorbed’) compounds in the original publication [4].

In the following example, only molecules that are predicted to be well-absorbed will be passed through:

ABSORPTION 1 1

To retrieve only compounds that are not passively absorbed, the following statement may be used:

ABSORPTION * 0

which is similar to:

ABSORPTION 0 0

Fragment and similarity filters

Fragment rules are specifications to define limits on the presence of user-definable molecular substructures within the input molecules. These substructures are defined by means of a SMARTS pattern, and the user can put limits on the number of occurrences for these particular fragments in each molecule. When counting the number of occurrences of a particular substructure in a target molecule, only unique matches are taken into account. A unique match is defined as one that does not cover the identical atoms that a previous match has covered. For instance, searching for the c1ccccc1 pattern in phenol will only yield one unique match.

In addition to specifying limits on the number of substructures present in the input file molecules, the user can also define similarity rules to specify criteria on the required minimum or maximum Tanimoto similarity to a reference fragment or reference molecule.

If a match has been found between the molecule and a fragment or if the similarity to a reference molecule is between the limits set by the similarity rule, the molecule is passed for this criterion. If a match cannot be found between the molecule and the fragment or if the similarity criteria are not satisfied, the molecule is flagged to fail for this rule. Multiple fragment rules, each specifying different fragment or similarity cutoffs, may be specified. In this case, each of the different rules will be checked for a valid match against each of the input molecules. A molecule is only passed successfully when it succeeds for all of the specified rules. This is different to the implementation of the TITLE keyword where multiple keywords may be provided, but where a molecule is passed successfully when matching at least one of the title keywords.

In the current version of Filter-it™, the following fragment and similarity rules have been implemented:

  • FRAGMENT
  • SIMILARITY
  • SIMILARITY_STACK

In the following sections, these fragment property rules are described in more detail.

FRAGMENT

The general syntax of fragment rule is:

FRAGMENT name smarts minimum maximum

FRAGMENT is the required keyword to specify a fragment rule. The name field specifies a user-definable name for the fragment, and the smarts field specifies the substructure in SMARTS terminology. The minimum and maximum limits define the allowed number of occurrences of the specific fragment in the molecule. These latter two fields are not required when the program is run in tabulate mode (--tab command line option).

In order to filter out molecules having less than one and more than two substituted phenyl rings, the following fragment rule could be specified:

FRAGMENT phenyl c1ccccc1 1 2

Unsubstituted phenyl rings are specified as:

FRAGMENT phenyl c1[cH][cH][cH][cH][cH]1 1 2

Filtering out all ester functionalities would require a fragment definition like this:

FRAGMENT ester [O;X2;H0][C;X3]=O 0 0

If an invalid SMARTS pattern is provided that the program cannot process, an error is written out and the program halts:

-> FRAGMENT  f1==============================
*** Open Babel Error  in SMARTSError
  SMARTS Error:
c1cxccc1
   ^

f1 "c1cxccc1": Failed parsing

As already mentioned, more than one fragment rule may be specified in the filter file. However, fragment rules having a name that is identical to an earlier defined rule name generate an error message.

SIMILARITY

The general syntax of similarity rules is:

SIMILARITY name smiles minimum maximum

SIMILARITY is the required keyword to specify a similarity rule. The name field specifies a user-definable name for the fragment, and the smiles field specifies the reference molecule or fragment in SMILES terminology. The minimum and maximum limits define the range of allowed Tanimoto similarity between the input molecules and the specified fragment.

When the program is run in tabulate mode (with the --tab command line option), the minimum and maximum limits are not required.

In order to reject molecules that have a Tanimoto similarity of less than 0.75 to a phenyl ring as reference, the following similarity rule could be specified:

SIMILARITY phenyl c1ccccc1 0.75 *

If an invalid SMILES pattern is provided that the program cannot process, an error is written out and the program halts:

-> FRAGMENT  f1==============================
*** Open Babel Error  in SMARTSError
  SMARTS Error:
c1cxccc1
   ^

f1 "c1cxccc1": Failed parsing

As already mentioned, more than one similarity rule may be specified in the filter file. However, similarity rules with names that are identical to earlier defined rules generate an error message.

SIMILARITY_STACK

The general syntax of similarity stack rules is:

SIMILARITY_STACK name smiles minimum maximum

SIMILARITY_STACK is the required keyword to specify a similarity stack rule. The minimum and maximum limits define the range of the required Tanimoto similarity between the input molecules and each of the molecules in the similarity stack. The name field specifies a user-definable name for the fragment, and the smiles field specifies the reference molecule or fragment in SMILES terminology.

With similarity stacks, the user can direct the program to evaluate the similarity of the input molecule against a set of user-defined fragments with the molecules that have previously successfully passed the similarity stack filter criteria. The implementation of a similarity stack can be clarified using an example based on the following input parameters:

SIMILARITY_STACK benzene c1ccccc1 * 0.5
SIMILARITY_STACK phenol c1ccccc1O * 0.5

In this example, the similarity stack is initially loaded with both the ‘benzene’ and ‘phenol’ fragments as defined in this filter file. The required minimum and maximum Tanimoto cutoff criteria are set to 0.0 and 0.5, respectively, thereby focusing on diversity rather than similarity. The program starts by calculating the Tanimoto similarity between the first molecule in the input file (--input) and each of the fragments on the similarity stack (in this example, the stack is initially loaded with the ‘benzene’ and ‘phenol’ fragments). If all of the calculated similarities between the input molecule and each of the two fragments on the similarity stack fall within the specified cutoff limits, the input molecule is added to the similarity stack and the same molecule is written to the passed molecules file. However, if at least one of the calculated similarities fails against the specified cutoff limits, then the molecule is not added to the similarity stack and is written to the failed molecules file. These series of steps is repeated for the second molecule in the input file, and continues until all input molecules have been processed accordingly.

In the case when different cutoff values have been specified on the different SIMILARITY_STACK lines, then the values of the last SIMILARITY_STACK specification are taken as the limits for the newly created molecules on the similarity stack. In the example below, the minimum and maximum Tanimoto cutoff values for all new molecules that are added to the stack during the run will be set to 0.1 and 0.4, respectively, since these are the limits that are specified at the last SIMILARITY_STACK line (for phenol). This means that, in order for a input molecule to get passed through the filter criteria, the molecule should have a Tanimoto similarity between 0 and 0.5 for benzene, and a similarity between 0.1 and 0.4 for phenol and all subsequent new molecules on the stack:

SIMILARITY_STACK benzene c1ccccc1 * 0.5
SIMILARITY_STACK phenol c1ccccc1O 0.1 0.4

If an invalid SMILES pattern is provided that the program cannot process, an error is written out and the program halts:

-> FRAGMENT  f1==============================
*** Open Babel Error  in SMARTSError
  SMARTS Error:
c1cxccc1
   ^

f1 "c1cxccc1": Failed parsing

Multiple SIMILARITY_STACK rules with the same name will lead to an error message with subsequent halt of the program.

Similarity stack calculations are not performed when the program is run in tabulate mode (--tab).

Distance filters

Distance rules define limits on the three-dimensional distances between a set of user-definable fragments or patterns. These patterns are defined by means of a SMARTS definition.

Distance rules are fully specified using the combination of two sets of keywords, namely the PATTERN and DISTANCE keywords. If a DISTANCE keyword is specified, then at least two PATTERN keywords should be specified to define the begin and end of the distance vector. However, PATTERN keywords may be specified without a DISTANCE keyword. In this case, only the presence of the specified patterns is checked without actually taking into account any distance limits, and its function becomes similar to the function of the FRAGMENT rules (with the exception that PATTERN cannot be used with minimum and maximum count criteria; see above).

Distance filters are not applied when Filter-it™ is run in tabulate mode (--tab).

PATTERN

The general syntax of the PATTERN rule is:

PATTERN name smarts [center_index_1 … center_index_n]

PATTERN is the required keyword to specify a pattern rule. The name field specifies a user-definable name for the pattern, and the smarts field specifies the substructure in SMARTS terminology. The optional center_index_1 up to center_index_n variables specify which atoms of the SMARTS pattern should be used to calculate the geometrical center of the pattern. Counting starts from 1, so the first atom in the SMARTS definition has index 1, and the last atom in the SMARTS string has an index that is equal to the number of atoms in the SMARTS. Indices lower than 1, or higher than the number of atoms in the SMARTS, will lead to an error and halt of the program. If the index variables are not provided, then the geometrical centrum of the entire SMARTS is used to calculate the distances.

In the following example a pattern is defined that matches phenyl rings. Since no optional indices are specified, the geometrical center is calculated from all six atoms:

PATTERN phenyl c1ccccc1

which is equal to specifying:

PATTERN phenyl c1ccccc1 1 2 3 4 5 6

By providing indices to the keyword line, one can specify which atoms should be included in the calculation of the geometrical center:

PATTERN phenyl c1ccccc1 1

Of course, this example should be used with care since it is unpredictable how the actual SMARTS pattern will be matched on a phenyl ring. A better example is the following:

PATTERN methoxy [OH]C 1

In this case, the geometrical center is put on the hydroxyl oxygen, while in the following specification the entire methoxy fragment (oxygen and carbon atom) is used to calculate the geometrical center from:

PATTERN methoxy [OH]C 1 2

which is equivalent to:

PATTERN methoxy [OH]C

If an invalid SMARTS pattern is provided that the program cannot process, an error is written out and the program halts:

-> FRAGMENT  f1==============================
*** Open Babel Error  in SMARTSError
  SMARTS Error:
c1cxccc1
   ^

f1 "c1cxccc1": Failed parsing

Multiple PATTERN rules with the same name will lead to an error message with subsequent halt of the program. When the defined pattern is not present in the molecule, then the molecule will not pass the filter and will be written to the failed molecules file.

DISTANCE

The general syntax of the DISTANCE rules is:

DISTANCE pattern1 pattern2 minimum maximum

DISTANCE is the required keyword to specify a distance rule. The pattern1 and pattern2 fields specify the two patterns for which the geometrical distance should be calculated, and this distance is compared to the specified minimum and maximum fields. If the actual distance is smaller than minimum or larger than maximum, the particular molecule is rejected and subsequently written to the failed molecules file. As with all other filter rules, the minimum and maximum fields can be left unspecified by working with a wildcard (*) character.

When the DISTANCE keyword is referring to a undefined pattern name, an error message is generated and the program halts:

ERROR: DISTANCE line with undeclared pattern name 1: phen

The same happens when the first and second specified pattern names are referring to the same pattern:

ERROR: DISTANCE line with duplicate pattern names (1 == 2): phenyl phenyl

For more technical information on the implementation of the fitting and matching process, the reader is referred below.

Sdf-data rules

Sdf-data rules are specifically implemented to filter sdf-files based on the content and presence of certain property tags. In an sdf-file, these property tags are specified by means of a property field name and its corresponding value:

> <TAGNAME> value
---- blank line ----

The property name starts with a ‘>’ sign and the tag name itself is enclosed in angle brackets. A blank line terminates each property entry. Molecules can have multiple tags with the same name, although such a situation is rather uncommon.

If a match has been found between the molecule and a sdf-tag rules, then the molecule is passed for this criterion. If a match cannot be found between the molecule and a sdf-tag rule, the molecule is flagged to fail for this rule. Multiple sdf-tag rules, each specifying different sdf-tags, may be specified. In this case, each of the different rules will be checked for a valid match against each of the input molecules. A molecule is only passed successfully when it succeeds for all of the specified sdf-tag rules. This is different to the implementation of the TITLE keyword where multiple keywords may be provided, but where a molecule is passed successfully when matching at least one of the TITLE keywords.

In the current version of Filter-it™, the following sdf-tag rules have been implemented:

  • SDFTAG
  • SDFTAG_VALUE

SDFTAG

This rule specifies the number of allowed property tags with the given name. The actual value of the property tag is not used as criterion in this rule:

SDFTAG <reg.no> 1 6

The example above passes those molecules that contain between one and six <reg.no> property tags. Molecules in sdf-files with more than six or less than one <reg.no> property tags are filtered out. Please note that the property tag name should be enclosed by angle brackets. This allows for the use of blanks in the property tag names.

SDFTAG_VALUE

This rule specifies limits on the actual value of the given property tag. The correct use is:

SDF_TAG <name> minimum maximum

The property tag name should be enclosed by angle brackets. This allows for the use of blanks in the property tag names. The minimum and maximum limits define the limits on the actual value of the name tag when represented as a number.

When run in standard non-tabulate mode, all values are treated and filtered as floating-point numbers. If the tag-value cannot be converted to a floating-point number, the compound gets flagged as being failed. Also, in the case the specified sdf-tag cannot be found for a given molecule, the molecule gets flagged as failed.

When the program is run in tabulate mode (--tab command line option), the tag-value is printed out with no conversion to a floating-point applied. Therefore, string values can also be output. In cases where the specified sdf-tag cannot be found for a given molecule, a value of zero is printed out.

The following example passes through all molecules in a sdf-file that contains <reg.no> property tags of which the actual value is between 1 and 6.5:

SDFTAG_VALUE <reg.no> 1 6.5

There is no check on the sdf-tag parameter itself, hence multiple SDFTAG_VALUE rules with identical sdf-tag specifications but different minimum and maximum values could be present in the filter file. In those cases, if one of these identical rules fails the filter criteria, then the molecule is flagged as failed. Only when all sdf-tag rules are passed successfully the molecule will be flagged as passed.

Example filter file

CMC likeness

The following example provides the physicochemical definitions for compounds with CMC-like properties. The CMC-v2007 database was used and only molecules with less than 60 non-hydrogen atoms of H, C, O, N, F, Cl, I, Br, S, or P were included. All molecules were ionized according a pH of 7.0. The spread was calculated as three times the standard deviation of the population:

ONLY_ELEMENTS                H C O N F Cl Br I S P
ATOMS                                   1       59
CARBONS                                 1       40
HETERO_ATOMS                            1       19
HETERO_CARBON_RATIO                   0.0      1.1
HALIDES                                 0        4
HALIDE_FRACTION                       0.0      0.2
ROTATABLE_BONDS                         0       20
RIGID_BONDS                             0       46
FLEXIBILITY                           0.0      0.7
CHIRAL_CENTERS                          0       10
HBOND_ACCEPTORS                         0       13
HBOND_DONORS                            0        9
LIPINSKI_ACCEPTORS                      0       15
LIPINSKI_DONORS                         0        9
FORMAL_CHARGES                          0        4
TOTAL_FORMAL_CHARGE                    -3        3
RINGSYSTEMS                             0        4
ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_RING                  3        7
ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_RINGSYSTEM            3       20
ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_RINGSYSTEM             3       20
RING_FRACTION                         0.2      1.0
SIDECHAINS                              0       10
ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_SIDECHAIN             1        9
ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_SIDECHAIN              1       16
SIDECHAIN_FRACTION                    0.0      0.8
CORES                                   0        1
ATOMS_IN_CORE                           3       35
CORE_FRACTION                         0.2      1.0
BRIDGES                                 0        2
ATOMS_IN_SMALLEST_BRIDGE                1        7
ATOMS_IN_LARGEST_BRIDGE                 1        7
BRIDGE_FRACTION                      0.00     0.25
MOLWT                                   0      750
LOGP                                  -11       14
LOGS                                  -11        3
TPSA                                    0      240
LIPINSKI_VIOLATIONS                     0        3
ANDREWS_ENERGY                        -22       42
LIGAND_EFFICIENCY                     0.0      0.8
ABSORPTION                              0        1

Calculation of physical properties

LogP

The implementation of the logP prediction in Filter-it™ is based on a proprietary fragment- and property-based method. As such, the logP is calculated from:

\[logP = \sum_{0 \le i \le 34}{p_i w_i}\]

with \(p_i\) being the value of property i, and \(w_i\) being the corresponding weight. A list of the defined fragments and properties with corresponding weights is given below:

 i  Property                                                                                   weight
--  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------    ------
 0  Count of F                                                                                 +1.570
 1  Count of Cl                                                                                +1.688
 2  Count of [Br,I]                                                                            +1.452
 3  Count of [$([NH2;!+;X3;v3]),$([NH3;+;X4;v4])]                                              -1.531
 4  Count of [$([NH1;!+;X3;v3]),$([NH2;+;X4;v4])]                                              -0.311
 5  Count of [$([NH1;!+;X2;v3]),$([NH2;+;X3;v4])]                                              -0.594
 6  Count of [$([NH0;!+;X2;v3]),$([NH1;+;X3;v4])]                                              +0.545
 7  Count of [$([NH0;!+;X1;v3]),$([NH1;+;X2;v4])]                                              -0.820
 8  Count of [$([NH0;+]);!$([N+](=O)[O-]);!$([N+]=[N-])]                                       -2.424
 9  Count of [N+]=[N-]                                                                         +1.686
10  Count of [$([n;!+]),$([nH;+])]                                                             -0.065
11  Count of [nH0;+]                                                                           -1.357
12  Count of [OH0;X2;v2]                                                                       +0.215
13  Count of [$([OH1;!-;X2;v2]),$([OH0;-;X1]);!$([N+](=O)[O-]);!$(C(=O)[OH]);!$(C(=O)[O-])]    -0.857
14  Count of [$([OH0;X1;v2]);!$([N+](=O)[O-]);!$(S=O);!$(P=O);!$(C(=O)[OH]);!$(C(=O)[O-])]     -0.214
15  Count of O~P(~O)(~O)~O                                                                     +0.665
16  Count of [$(P);!$(O~P(~O)(~O)~O)]                                                          +0.841
17  Count of [SH0;X2;v2]                                                                       -0.547
18  Count of [$([SH1;X2;v2]),$([SH0;-])]                                                       -1.609
19  Count of O=S                                                                               +0.351
20  Count of [CH3;!R]                                                                          +0.128
21  Count of [CH2;!R]                                                                          +0.215
22  Count of [CH1;!R]                                                                          +0.132
23  Count of [CH0;!R]                                                                          +0.065
24  Count of [cH0]                                                                             +0.139
25  Count of [cH1]                                                                             -0.080
26  Count of [CH1;R]                                                                           -0.197
27  (Intercept)                                                                                -0.717
28  ATOMS                                                                                      +0.142
29  HETERO_ATOMS                                                                               -1.600
30  RINGSYSTEMS                                                                                +0.246
31  HETERO_CARBON_RATIO                                                                        +0.538
32  MOLWT                                                                                      +0.006
33  RING_FRACTION                                                                              +1.736
34  TPSA                                                                                       +0.076

The coefficients were obtained from least-squares fitting against 23,455 experimental logP values from the PHYSPROP database. Only compounds with a molecular weight between 200 and 600 Da and with experimental logP values between -2.6 and 8.1 were included in the fitting process to limit the contribution of outliers and molecules with limited drug-like properties.

A plot of the calculated versus the experimental logP values is given in Figure 4 and Figure 5. Residual standard error is 1.17 on 23,415 degrees of freedom.

Figure 4

Figure 4. Scatter plot of the entire set of experimental logP values versus calculated logP. Only compounds with a molecular weight between 200 and 600 Da were used in this scatter plot.

Figure 5

Figure 5. Comparison of the distribution of the experimental and calculated logP values for the entire set of 24,701 compounds. The means of the experimental and calculated distributions are 2.75 and 2.79, respectively, while the corresponding standard deviations are respectively 2.69 and 2.04.

LogS

The implementation of the logS prediction in Filter-it™ is based on a simple fragment-based method. For this, the logS is calculated from:

\[logS = 0.898 + 0.104 \sqrt{MOLWT} + w_i c_i\]

with \(w_i\) and \(c_i\) being the respective weights and counts for fragment i, and MOLWT the molecular weight of the compound. A list of the defined fragments with corresponding weights is provided below:

 i   Property                   w(i)
--   -----------------------   ------
 0   Count of [NH0;X3;v3]      +0.715
 1   Count of [NH2;X3;v3]      +0.411
 2   Count of [nH0;X3]         +0.825
 3   Count of [OH0;X2;v2]      +0.315
 4   Count of [OH0;X1;v2]      +0.148
 5   Count of [OH1;X2;v2]      +0.630
 6   Count of [CH2;!R]         -0.356
 7   Count of [CH3;!R]         -0.339
 8   Count of [CH0;R]          -0.219
 9   Count of [CH2;R]          -0.231
10   Count of [ch0]            -0.376
11   Count of [ch1]            -0.224
12   Count of F                -0.217
13   Count of Cl               +0.497
14   Count of Br               -0.580
15   Count of I                -0.515

A plot of the calculated versus the experimental logS values is given in Figure 6:

Figure 6

Figure 6. Scatter plot of the experimental versus calculated logS values.

TPSA

The topological polar surface area implementation in Filter-it™ is based on the work of Peter Ertl and coworkers [1].

Ligand efficiency

The ligand efficiency in this version of Filter-it™ is a proprietary version calculated using a fragment-based approach, in which the coefficients were obtained by fitting against 857 experimentally determined binding free energies from the Binding MOAD database and the calculated ligand efficiencies thereof.

The predicted ligand efficiency is calculated from the following equation:

\[LE = -0.013 hba + 0.0849 hcr + 0.0036 tpsa - 0.014 \frac{tpsa}{\ln (atoms) } - 0.3156 \ln (atoms)\]

with LE being the calculated ligand efficiency, hba the number of hydrogen bond acceptors as calculated by the HBOND_ACCEPTORS filter, hcr the hetero/carbon ratio as calculated by the HETERO_CARBON_RATIO filter, tpsa the topological polar surface area as calculated by the TPSA filter, and atoms being the total number of non-hydrogen atoms as calculated by the ATOMS filter.

Analysis of this regression equation shows that the ligand efficiency is influenced by a subtle equilibrium between the number of atoms and the topological polar surface area. For smaller ligands, optimal ligand efficiency is achieved when the topological polar surface area is increased, while for larger compounds the reverse is true (Figure 7):

Figure 7

Figure 7. Subtle equilibrium between the topological polar surface area (TPSA), the number of atoms, and the ligand efficiency (LE).

For optimal ligand efficiency, small fragments should be as polar as possible, while the larger, more drug-like molecules, should be rather lipophilic. In addition to this equilibrium between the number of atoms and topological polar surface area, ligand efficiency is also increased by a larger hetero atom/carbon ratio, but increasing the number of hydrogen bond donor atoms rather than increasing the acceptor atoms should only increase this hetero atom/carbon ratio.

The experimental versus predicted ligand efficiencies are plotted in Figure 8. Distributions of the two populations are shown in Figure 9.

Figure 8

Figure 8. Experimental versus predicted ligand efficiencies as calculated by the method in Filter-it™. Residual standard error is 0.1075 on 851 degrees of freedom. R2 equals 0.42.

Figure 9

Figure 9. Distribution of the predicted and calculated ligand efficiencies that were used in the training of the model. The mean of the experimental distribution is 0.37 with a standard deviation of 0.14, while the mean of the predicted distribution is also 0.37 with a standard deviation of 0.15.

An alternative approach to extract compounds that might have an intrinsic large ligand efficiency is to focus on the number of heavy atoms. This approach has the advantage that it is not based on an underlying mathematical model that has been trained on a rather limited dataset with possibly restricted predictive power. The distribution of the number of atoms for molecules having a smaller or larger experimental ligand efficiency than the mean is shown in Figure 10. From this figure, it is clear that there is a significant difference to be noted between the two distributions. For molecules with an experimental ligand efficiency larger than the mean ligand efficiency (>0.37), the distribution peaks around 18-22 heavy atoms, while for the molecules with a ligand efficiency <0.37 the maximum is around 34 heavy atoms. A total of 28 atoms seems to be the cutoff value to separate both distributions.

Figure 10

Figure 10. Histogram showing the distribution of the number of atoms as a function of the experimental ligand efficiency (LE). The yellow bars show the distribution of all molecules having an experimental LE that is larger than the mean (> 0.37), while the green bars show the distribution of all molecules with an experimental LE smaller than 0.37.

Based on these observations, an interesting alternative approach could be to include a filter based on the number of atoms, for example keeping only those molecules in which the total number of heavy atoms is between 12 and 28. The accuracy of this approach in extracting molecules having a ligand efficiency larger than 0.37 is somewhat less than with the LIGAND_EFFICIENCY filter approach, but the predictive power might be comparable:

Predicted LE Number of atoms
<0.37 >0.37 >27 <27
True LE <0.37 44.3% 13.0% 34.9% 21.4%
True LE >0.37 9.8% 32.6% 5.8% 35.5%

Distance filters

Distance filters are implemented as geometrical distance constraints between user-specified patterns. These patterns are implemented as SMARTS queries. Since a given pattern may have more than one occurrence in a given molecule, a specific procedure is needed to ensure consistency between the different distance constraints. In the following sections, this procedure is highlighted in more detail. For consistency, the following nomenclature is used:

pattern
a SMARTS representation of the user-defined substructure;
match
a match occurs when a pattern is found in a given molecule. For each pattern, there could be a single match, multiple matches, or none (Figure 11).
Figure 11

Figure 11. Example showing the relation between pattern and matches. In the example given in this figure, the molecule has three occurrences of a carboxyl group, and therefore three matches of the C=O pattern. In addition, a single match was found for the ncn pattern. Between the matches of both patterns, 1 x 3 distances can be calculated, and of which only one distance falls within the limits of 6-8 Å. Since at least one distance is fitting within the user-defined limits, the distance criterion id considered to fulfill the criteria.

A distance constraint between two patterns is obeyed if the distance between the two patterns falls within the defined limits of the distance constraint. When multiple matches are found for a given pattern, it is sufficient for a distance to be obeyed if the distance between at least one of the matches is falling within the limits (Figure 11).

With three or more patterns per molecule, the situation becomes slightly more complicated. In this case, only the matches that obey all distances are considered in the final criteria (Figure 11).

Figure 12

Figure 12. The four distance constraints are along the edges of the squares (not shown), and the distance that obey the user-defined criteria are shown in green. (a) Example that fulfills are distance constraints and therefore considered to be a ‘pass’. (b) Example in which the distance constraints between the four patterns are fulfilled, but because non-consistent matches are involved it is considered to be a ‘fail’. (c) Example of a ‘fail’ since two of the four distance constraints are not fulfilled. (d) Another example of a ‘fail’ since for one pattern there are no matches.

Installation

Installation of the Filter-it™ program relies on the libraries of OpenBabel version 2.3. Installation of OpenBabel is exemplified in the Configuring OS X for chemoinformatics section of this website.

The installation of Filter-it™ assumes that the BABEL_DATADIR, BABEL_LIBDIR, and BABEL_INCLUDEDIR point to the directories where OpenBabel has been installed:

> echo $BABEL_INCLUDEDIR
/usr/local/openbabel/include/openbabel-2.0/
> echo $BABEL_LIBDIR
/usr/local/lib/openbabel/2.3.1/
> echo $BABEL_DATADIR
/usr/local/openbabel/share/openbabel/2.3.1/

Start by downloading Filter-it™ from our software section and un-tar this file into the /usr/local/src directory:

> cd /usr/local/src
> sudo tar -xvf ~/Downloads/filter-it-1.0.2.tar.gz

Change into this directory and start the building process:

> cd filter-it-1.0.2
> sudo mkdir build
> cd build
> sudo cmake ..
> sudo make
> sudo make install

This latter command will install the Filter-it™ executable in the /usr/local/bin/ directory. Finally, check the installation by entering:

> make test

This should complete all tests without errors.

References

[1](1, 2) Ertl, P.; Rohde, B.; Selzer, P. (2000) ‘Fast calculation of molecular polar surface area as a sum of fragment-based contributions and its application to the prediction of drug transport properties’, J. Med. Chem. 43, 3714-3717 [pubmed/11020286]
[2]Andrews, P.R.; Craik, D.J.; Martin, J.L. (1984) ‘Functional group contributions to drug-receptor interactions’, J. Med. Chem. 27, 1648-1657 [pubmed/6094812]
[3]Gleeson, P.M.; Hersey, A.; Montanari, D.; Overington, J. (2011) ‘Probing the links between in vitro potency, ADMET and physicochemical parameters’, Nature Rev. Drug Discovery 10, 197-208 [nature/nrd3367]
[4](1, 2, 3) Egan, W.J.; Merz, Jr., K.M.; Baldwin, J.J. (2000) ‘Prediction of drug absorption using multivariate statistics’, J. Med. Chem. 43, 3867-3877 [acs/jm000292e]
[5](1, 2, 3) Lipinski, C.A.; Lombardo, F.; Dominy, B.W.; Feeney, P.J. (2001) ‘Experimental and computational approaches to estimate solubility and permeability in drug discovery and development settings’, Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev. 46, 3-26 [pubmed/11259830]

Revision history

Version 1.0.2

[released on April 26, 2013]

Updated the copyright dates in the source code.

Included the PAINS filter definition files which were kindly provided by Chris Swain and also available from his macinchem site.

Version 1.0.1

[released on September 20, 2012]

The input/output parameters and program logic have been improved:

  • --pass=[file] now requires the specification of an output [file]
  • --fail=[file] now requires the specification of an output [file]

Corrected a bug in the SIMILARITY_STACK property (molecules with space-containing molecular titles were handled incorrectly).

Documentation has been updated and more information on the logic and use of standard output and standard error has been included.

Version 1.0.0

This is the first official release of Filter-it™. The program is a successor of the program Sieve from Silicos and is branched out of version 3.1.0 of Sieve.

Additions to the original Sieve version include:

  • Added the --inputFormat, --passFormat and --failFormat options;
  • Added the possibility of directing output to standard output for the --fail and --pass cases.
  • Ported the documentation to html and included some improvements.
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Current projects

  • Optimisation of novel PPI's
  • Design of anti-viral compounds
  • Novel fragment-based descriptors

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